Current Project

Current Project

Each quarter we feature a non-profit that has an impact on our national parks, forests and more. 

amazon conservation

Amazon Conservation 

Join our fight to protect the greatest wild forest on Earth!
Protecting the Amazon means safeguarding millions of species of animals, plants, and insects who call it home. It means allowing indigenous communities and locals whose livelihoods depend on the forest to thrive. It means stabilizing our planet's climate and protecting 20% of the oxygen production of our world. It means a lot.

OUR RESPONSE TO THE FIRES IN THE AMAZON

The fires in the Amazon rainforest of Brazil and Bolivia have been burning for three weeks now. Over four million acres have been lost.

Although Amazon Conservation cannot stop the current fires from happening - at this point, only national and local authorities can - we can help prevent them from happening.  

Amazon Conservation has been working on the ground in the Amazon of Peru and Bolivia for 20 years, and providing local communities and governments with fire prevention training and supplies, so that local people can be better prepared and at the forefront of preventing and fighting forest fires. We also work directly with land owners to help them manage their land in a more sustainable manner, to reduce fire risk, if they do happen, to limit their spread and impact. 

Not only do we carryout this on-the-ground, in-country support, but we also provide governments and the general public with key information about new fires in the western Amazon. Using our real-time satellite monitoring program (MAAP), we quickly locate burning forests and report this information in real-time to local authorities so that they can take action on the ground before the situation escalates as it has in Brazil. By releasing this information publicly on our website, we provide the public with key data on deforestation that is happening now so that they can compel authorities to take action. 

“The majority of fires are caused by human activity,” said John Beavers, Amazon Conservation's Executive Director. “And only human activity can prevent and stop them. Now more than ever we need to band together. In the same way that the world came together to reconstruct the Notre Dame Cathedral when it burned, we must do the same for the Amazon now.”

mind the wild

 

Past Projects:

2019: National Forest Foundation